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Tag Archives: Destroyer

2011 Albums of the Year

John Maus

I’m not a great blogger that is for sure. The start of the year witnessed my streak of blog posts and reviews, until summer came and my time and resources went elsewhere. Now, at this year’s end I am back to give you my input of 2011 in music:

2011 was a fruitful year, although this year lacked a definitive “best” album (like last year’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy) it featured numerous quality releases. The list I’m writing for you here was limited to just ten, leading me to leave several albums I found great off of this list. Trends that began in past years continued, specifically the small-imprint trend, growing in quality and quantity. The exodus from bedroom to studio has continued from bands in the independent music scene, few artists are releasing anything that sounds like it came from modest production efforts. Listen to the production in albums like Bon Iver or Father, Son, Holy Ghost, they’re deep, round, and spacious. Yet on another hand, artists are still borrowing sounds of the past and re-appropriating them as their own, although now in ways that blur the past and the present. An example would be John Maus’ release; We Must Become the Pitiless Censors of Ourselves, this album sounds natively 80s, but, is it really? Despite synthesizers turned all the way up, nothing in the 80s could be related without argument. Better yet is Daniel Lopatin’s Oneohtrix Point Never project, in his latest album, Replica, he samples 1980-90s daytime/late-night television commercials (which sounds like) straight from VHS. The final result is a creation that romanticizes one’s feeling of nostalgia.

Here are my top albums of 2011…

*Best of 2011*

10) Girls
Father, Son, Holy Ghost
[True Panther Sounds]
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09) Drake
Take Care
[Cash Money]
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08) Shabazz Palaces
Black Up
[Sub Pop]
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07) Bon Iver
Bon Iver
[Jagjaguwar/4AD]
Bon-Iver-Album-Cover

06) Gang Gang Dance
Eye Contact
[4AD]
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05) Atlas Sound
Parallax
[4AD]
alb_Atlas-Sound_full

04) Destroyer
Kaputt
[Merge]
10_700_700_369_destroyer_kaputt_mini_3x3

03) Future Islands
On the Water
[Thrill Jockey]
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02) Oneohtrix Point Never
Replica
[Software/Mexican Summer]
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01) John Maus
We Must Become the Pitiless Censors of Ourselves
[Ribbon Music]
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Here is a list of my twenty favorite songs from 2011. These are listed in alphabetical order.

A Winged Victory for the Sullen – Steep Hills of Vicodin Tears
Atlas Sound – Te Amo
Cass McCombs – County Line
Death Grips – Guillotine
Destroyer – Blue Eyes
DJ Diamond – Horns
Drake – Doing It Wrong
Ford & Lopatin – Too Much MIDI (Please Forgive Me)
Gang Gang Dance – Glass Jar
Girls – Alex
Jay-Z / Kanye West – Otis
John Maus – Hey Moon
Kids on a Crime Spree – Trumpets of Death
Lana Del Rey – Born To Die
Laura Marling – Sophia
Nicki Minaj – Super Bass
Oneohtrix Point Never – Up
Thee Oh Sees – The Dream
Tom Waits – Bad as Luce
2 Chainz – Spend It (Remix) (Feat. T.I.)

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Destroyer - Kaputt The Canadian independent rock band Destroyer has released their ninth LP, Kaputt, and it is the best fusion of musical genres since Deerhunter dropped Microcastle in 2008. Whereas the latter blended ’50s-pop with shoegaze and punk, Kaputt takes indie rock and mixes it with pop, disco, and smooth jazz. And, we’re talking about Dan Bejar here, so let’s not forget about the stellar songwriting (of course) that flows throughout this album.

I’m typically one who forgets to listen to lyrics when hearing music, often getting caught up in the different melodies and sounds, which is very easy to do with Kaputt, but Dan Bejar is just too poetic to not reach out for the liner notes and analyze what he just sung. There isn’t one track that specifically exhibits his songwriting skills more than others; they’re all superb works of writing that move synchronously, even elaborating the soundscape. It all sounds very natural, which is probably just the way it left his pen originally.

As mentioned earlier with the smooth jazz influences present in this album, there are sentiments that evoke the feelings of an after-hours night club in the early 1980s. Men and women dressed dapper, with martinis, cigarettes, and cocaine, back-lit with soft neon lights. Although somehow, Destroyer is able to pull it off in a good way without making it feel contrived or cheap. It sounds completely sincere as if it could be no other way. On nearly every track there is a MIDI groove that makes the album feel dance-y too, something that isn’t necessarily surprising for Destroyer. Although the band is rooted in Canadian indie rock (think Sunset Rubdown or The New Pornographers), this isn’t a left turn for the band by any means. The album’s final track, “Bay of Pigs” which is specifically the “danciest” track on the album, sheds light on the sonic direction Destroyer was heading when this track originally appeared on an EP two years ago. Even with the smooth jazz and MIDI samples, Kaputt is substantially guitar-driven. Examples include the subtle finger-tapping segment that appears out of nowhere on “Blue Eyes” to the riffs during the middle of “Savage Night at the Opera.” The way that Destroyer is able to let elements float in and out before you can even notice they’re happening allows this album to engage the listener throughout its 50-minute (70-minute vinyl) playtime.

Unfortunately, the album has one soft spot. Smack in the center of the album is the song “Poor in Love,” while not necessarily a bad tune, it just doesn’t weight up to the rest of the album. I’m willing to forgive this, considering that “Blue Eyes” will definitely get “Song of the Year” nods from me, it’s an amazing pop song that has help from Vancouver-vocalist Sibel Thrasher. She appears several times throughout the album and her voice is used to add emotion to Bejar’s poetic lyrics. Her voice is also used effectively in “Downtown,” a track that owes its sound to southern soul, until a glittering synth washes over everything.

It is just February but this is a must-hear album of 2011. Bejar has already proved that he is a standout singer-songwriter with his previous albums and this continues to defend his case, despite the brief hiccup of 2008’s Trouble in Dreams. The elements of jazz (be it smooth or free-form) and pop coupled with Bejar’s songwriting abilities is what let’s this album shine. I’m sure Kaputt will stand up to any other album that is released later this year.

(Reviewer’s Score: 4.4/5)